Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

The Hearing Aid Museum

Hearing Aids of all types—Ear Trumpets, Carbon Hearing Aids, Vacuum Tube Hearing Aids, Transistor Hearing Aids, Body Hearing Aids, Eyeglass Hearing Aids and much more!

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Vacuum Tube Hearing Aids: 1921-1953

Beltone Harmony Vacuum Tube Hearing Aid

The Beltone Harmony vacuum tube one-piece hearing aid was produced by the Beltone Electronics Corp. of Chicago, IL.

The Harmony was Beltone's second one-piece vacuum tube hearing aid. It came out in 1946, two years after their Monopac.

The overall dimensions are 4¼” by 2¾” by 7/8”. It weighed 5 oz. without the batteries.

The Harmony came with either a magnetic or a crystal receiver. The crystal receiver is shown in the top picture.

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Top view of the Beltone Harmony showing the on-off switch/3 position (1, 2 & 3 dots) tone control (left), receiver cord jack (center) and volume control (far right).
 


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The picture at the right shows the opened battery with the 1.4 Volt (RM-4) mercury cell for the A battery, and the space for the larger 30 Volt (type 413) B battery. It was the smallest 30 volt "B" battery on the market at that time.
 


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Note the green dot on the back of the case at the right, diagonally above the screw hole. A green dot in this position indicated the aid was set up for a crystal receiver. You can see a corresponding indentation on the left. When this indentation was painted green, it indicated the aid was designed to use the magnetic receiver.

 

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The two receivers are shown here for comparison. The magnetic receiver is on the left and the crystal receiver is on the right.

A magnetic receiver is basically a tiny loudspeaker.

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This is the Beltone "Phantomold," or what is referred to as a "Link." It was often used so that the rather large button receiver did not show in the ear. The plastic tubing connected the receiver through a tube up to an ear mold. The button receiver was hidden under the person’s collar.

These links are still used by broadcasters to hide the in-ear device.

 

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A view of the Beltone Harmony in its original box.

 

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A view of the Beltone Harmony case.

 

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The manual that came with the Beltone Harmony. If you are interested, you can read this manual.

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Here is the receipt for the original purchase of this Beltone Harmony hearing aid. It cost $160.00 in 1947 when it was sold.

Note that the receipt shows the model as "magnetic". This particular hearing aid used a magnetic receiver rather than a crystal receiver.

 


 

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