Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

The Hearing Aid Museum

Hearing Aids of all types—Ear Trumpets, Carbon Hearing Aids, Vacuum Tube Hearing Aids, Transistor Hearing Aids, Body Hearing Aids, Eyeglass Hearing Aids and much more!

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Body Style Transistor Hearing Aids

Acousticon Model A-335 Transistor (Body) Hearing Aid

The Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid was produced by Dictograph Products Corporation of New York, NY in 1953.

The 3-transistor Acousticon Model A-335 had a gold anodized aluminum case and measured 3 1/16” x 1¾” by 13/16” (7.8 x 4.5 x 2.1 cm). It weighed 2.8 oz. (78 g) without the batteries.

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Front view of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the 4-section microphone grill that surrounds the Acousticon crown logo.

Note the wire pocket clip below the microphone grill.



 

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Rear view of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the Acousticon name and model number (upper back) and the swing-up battery door (bottom).



 

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Close-up view of the upper back of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the the Acousticon name, the "A" logo, and below that the model number (Mod. A-335).



 

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Top view of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the volume control/on-off switch (upper right), the receiver cord jack (lower left) and the ?tone control (lower right).



 

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Top right-corner view of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the receiver cord plug and jack. Note the long flat pins on the plug.



 

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Top view of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the receiver cord plugged into the jack.

 



 

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Close-up view of the battery compartment of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing how the battery door swung up from the bottom.

 


 

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Close-up view of the battery compartment of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the two Mallory RM-1 batteries in place.

 


 

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Close-up view of the inside of the lid of the battery compartment door of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing a sticker reading "Max. battery voltage 2.5 v." which is the voltage of two mercury batteries in series (as shown above).


 

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Close-up view of the bottom front of the battery compartment of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the serial number (28520) stamped into the case. The serial number is hidden when the battery compartment door is closed.


 

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View of the bone conductor transducer (left) and headband of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid.

This hearing aid could use a standard receiver and ear mold (not shown) or a bone conductor transducer as shown here.
 

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View of the headband of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid showing the gimble bracket (left) to hold the transducer tightly against the mastoid bone behind the ear.


 

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Close-up view of the back of the bone conductor transducer of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid. Across the top is the word "Acousticon". Below the pink dot (center) is "Pat. No. 1630028" and at the bottom is the number "34".


 

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Close-up front view of the bone conductor transducer of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid. This is the side that went against the mastoid bone behind the ear.

The slight vibrations of the transducer were picked up by the skull and transmitted to the inner ear, bypassing the middle ear. It was useful for people that had hearing loss due to problems in the middle ear. Such losses were known as conductive losses.

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There were two styles of cords connecting the bone conduction transducer to the hearing aid body. This is the earlier style where the pins were separate from each other.

Here the pins are shown unplugged from the transducer of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid.


 

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In this view, the pins are plugged into the bone conductor transducer of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid.

 


 

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Close-up view of the later style of the bone conduction cord plug of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid shown here unplugged.

 


 

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View of the later style of the bone conductor plug plugged into the bone conductor transducer of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid.
 

 

 

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View of the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid in its two-level case. The body aid fit in the upper level and the headband and bone conductor transducer and cords stowed on the lower level.


 

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Outside view of the case the Acousticon Model A-335 transistor hearing aid came in. This case measured 7⅜" x 5⅜" x 3⅛" (18.7 x 13.8 x 8.0 cm).


 

 

 

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