Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

The Hearing Aid Museum

Hearing Aids of all types—Ear Trumpets, Carbon Hearing Aids, Vacuum Tube Hearing Aids, Transistor Hearing Aids, Body Hearing Aids, Eyeglass Hearing Aids and much more!

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Hearing Aid Batteries

Sonotone No. 650 Hearing Aid Battery

This is an Sonotone No. 600 2.8 volt mercury hearing aid battery used in the Sonotone Model 1111 transistor body hearing aids that came out in 1953.

It was manufactured by Sonotone Corp. of Elmsford, NY.

It weighed 0.8 oz. (28 g), and measured 1¼" in height by 1" wide x ½" thick (3.1 x 2.5 x 1.3 cm).

According to this invoice, it sold for $1.50 in 1962.

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Back

 
Front view of the Sonotone No. 650 battery showing the patent number (2422045) which was filed in 1945 and issued in 1947.

The battery was installed in the hearing aid correctly if it looked just like this—the writing right side up and the arrow pointing to the right.

 

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View of the backof the Sonotone No. 650 battery.

 

 

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Side view of the Sonotone No. 650 battery showing the model number (650). This battery looks the same as the model 600. Perhaps it has a higher capacity than the model 600.

 

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Front and top view of the Sonotone No. 650 battery showing the polarity of the two terminals. The round terminal has a negative polarity, while the rectangular terminal has a positive polarity.

 

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Top view of the Sonotone No. 650 battery showing the double cell arrangement. The positive terminal is the rectangular pad and the negative terminal is the round one. The two cells were wired in series to give 2.8 volts

 

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Bottom view of the Sonotone No. 650 mercury battery showing the single positive terminal on the bottom of one cell. With this arrangement, the battery could provide both 1.4 volts and 2.8 volts at the same time, except that the positive terminal is coated with a clear plastic resin so it can only be used as a 2.8 volt battery. This arrangement works for the Sonotone 1111 hearing aid of 1953 which doesn't require the split voltage like the Sonotone 200 hearing aid of 1956 does.

 

 

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