Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

The Hearing Aid Museum

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Miscellaneous Hearing Aid Accessories

Phonak MicroLink FM System

The Phonak MicroLink FM System was made by Phonak A/G of Stafa, Switzerland (part of the Sonova Group) in 1998.

The system consisted of a TX3 HandyMic (a fixed-channel FM transmitter) and a MLx FM receiver that attached to certain Phonak BTE hearing aids via an "Audio-shoe" ("boot"). The HandyMic could be handheld, placed on a table or worn on a lanyard around your neck.

The HandyMic measured 4¾" x 1¼" x ⅞" (12.1 x 3.2 x 2.2 cm) and weighed 3 oz (85 g) with it's internal rechargeable battery.

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View of the rear of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the nameplate containing the manufacturer's name (Phonak), the model (HandyMic), the location made (Switzerland) and the serial number (24 569).


 

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Front view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the microphone pattern icons (top center), the on-off/microphone pattern switch (large silver slider—upper right, the red battery charging light/low battery light (mid left), and the Phonak name (bottom).

Read the Phonak MicroLink User Guide here.

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Rear view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic.

 

 

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Upper front view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the four position switch for setting the sound pick-up pattern of the microphone to "Super Zoom" (narrow-angle sound pickup), "Zoom" (wider-angle sound pickup), "Omni" (360° sound pickup) and "Off" respectively.

The silver slider switch had a notch in the top that "cradled" the setting being used. It is shown in the "off" position. (The off symbol is in the "notch".

The slot on the left side is the microphone port.

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Right side view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing how the "stand" pulled out from the top so the microphone could stand on a table or counter. The power cord jack is near the top (right).

 

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Bottom left side view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the dual-function direct audio input jack/antenna jack.

The antenna needed to be attached if using the HandyMic at distances greater than 10' (2 m).

With the antenna attached, the HandyMic had an operating range of 25' to 50' (7 - 15 m).

 

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Close-up bottom rear view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the frequency module door in the open position. Note the slots in the sides of the door so the frequency module could slide into place. The frequency module is at the upper right showing the pins on its bottom that line up with the corresponding pins in the HandyMic compartment.

 

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Close-up bottom rear view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the frequency module door in the open position. The frequency module is at the upper right showing its channel number (N09).

The HandyMic was a single-frequency unit, so to change frequencies, you changed the frequency module. Note: the frequency module had to be the same frequency as the frequency of the MLx receiver attached to your hearing aids in order for them to work together.

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Close-up bottom rear view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the frequency module door opened and the frequency module slid into the slots in the door.

 

 

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Close-up bottom rear view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic showing the frequency module door in the closed position. The frequency of the module shows through the clear plastic door—in this case, channel 9.

Note: Phonak FM systems in the USA operated on one or more of the 23 narrow-band channels in the 216-217 MHz band. All Phonak FM transmitters and receivers are compatible with every other model of transmitter and receiver in the Phonak product line. Each transmitter and receiver channel 'frequency' is identified with a number. The number of the transmitter and FM receiver must be the same for these units to function together correctly.

 

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Close-up view of the Phonak MicroLink Model MLx FM receiver showing the on-off switch (left side) in the off position, the Phonak name (top center) and the 3-prong plug (right) that plugged into the "audio-shoe" (boot) on the bottom of a Phonak BTE hearing aid.

Note that by itself, the HandyMic was useless. It needed a corresponding FM receiver attached to a hearing aid in order to get its signal into the hearing aid.

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Close-up view of the Phonak MicroLink Model MLx receiver showing its small size in relation to a penny.

 

 

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Close-up view of the Phonak MicroLink Model MLx receiver showing the frequency code (N01) in the green window.

The Phonak MicroLink Model MLx receiver was a single-frequency receiver. The HandyMic and the MLx receiver both needed to operate on the same frequency (have the same frequency codes) in order to work together.
 

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Close-up view of a Phonak "audio-shoe", "shoe" or more commonly, "boot".

The "boot" got its name because it fit on the bottom of certain behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aids that had special direct audio input (DAI) connectors that mated with the connectors in the boot.

The clear plastic top snapped into place over the bottom of the hearing aid.
 

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The Phonak MicroLink MLx FM receiver fit into the bottom of the boot (shown here unplugged).

 

 

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Close-up view of a Phonak "audio-shoe" with the Phonak MicroLink MLx FM receiver plugged into it.

This whole assembly made the BTE hearing aid hang down more, but if gave FM capabilities to the hearing aid.

 

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The Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic is almost dwarfed by its battery charger. The charger cord plugged into the jack on the upper right side of the HandyMic.

 

 

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Close-up view of the front of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic battery charger showing its electrical specifications.

 

 

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Side view of the Phonak MicroLink Model TX3 HandyMic battery charger.

 

 


 

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