Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum
Hugh Hetherington Hearing Aid Museum

The Hearing Aid Museum

Hearing Aids of all types—Ear Trumpets, Carbon Hearing Aids, Vacuum Tube Hearing Aids, Transistor Hearing Aids, Body Hearing Aids, Eyeglass Hearing Aids and much more!

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Click on the "General Information" button (top button above) for an overview and general information on this category of hearing aid.

 

Carbon Hearing Aids: 1900-1939

Acousticon Model 28 (Resonant Case) Carbon Hearing Aid

The Acousticon model 28 Resonant Case version was the same hearing aid as the Model 28 but with the addition of a resonant case. It was manufactured by the General Acoustic Company, which later became Dictograph Products, Inc. of New York, NY.

Since the model 28 came out around Acousticon's 25th anniversary in 1928, in honor of this, the microphone and volume control were inlaid with a fancy pattern.

The model 28 was manufactured between 1927 and 1932. It replaced the Acousticon model SRB.

See the previous listing for more details of the Acousticon Model 28 carbon hearing aid including the volume control and headphones.
 

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Front view of the Acousticon Model 28 resonant case showing the microphone (bottom center of case).

In addition the resonant case doubles as a carrying case for the battery and various components of this hearing aid.

The idea of a resonant case seems to be that the sounds picked up by the microphone would be "better" than otherwise. However, since the backs of the carbon microphones were sealed, it is doubtful that resonant cases lived up to their hype.

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The inside of the lid of the resonant case of the Acousticon Model 28 hearing aid reads, "Acousticon, Dictograph Products Company Inc, New York.

 

 

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The front of the resonant case opens downward so you could take the microphone out of the resonant case. It is held in place by 3 clips. The top one (bottom center) is spring loaded. You just pushed on it and pulled the microphone out if you chose not to use the resonant case.

 

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The Acousticon model 28 also came with a microphone stand (bottom) so the microphone could be used without the case. The plugs of the microphone cord fitted into slots in the stand to hold the microphone upright.

The microphone also had a clip on its back so you could clip the microphone to a pocket on your clothes for portable use.

 

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The Acousticon Model 28 microphone in its table stand for use without the resonant case.

Notice the fancy "Silver Anniversary" design on the front of the microphone and stand.

 

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Close-up of the bottom edge of the Acousticon Model 28 carbon microphone showing the model number (left), battery plugs (center) and serial number (right).

 
 

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Close up of the Acousticon model 28 receiver (right) and stock ear mold (left) The ear mold snapped on to the receiver. The two "posts" are of different diameters so the ear mold could only snap on in the correct position.
 
 

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View of the left stock ear mold for the Acousticon Model 28 carbon hearing aid. The center earpiece pulled out for cleaning or replacing. There were different sizes of earpieces to fit the various diameters of people's ear canals.

 
 

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The Acousticon Model 28 came with both a left and right stock ear mold so you could wear it in either ear.
 

 

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The Acousticon No. 2B battery that came with this Acousticon model 28 carbon hearing aid was rather unusual in that you could select either 1˝ or 3 volts depending if you needed more volume for more severe hearing losses or not. It is shown here plugged into the 3 volt terminal.

 

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The battery clips pushed onto the battery terminals and snapped into place. The positive clip (left) was larger so only fit on the positive terminal (left) of the battery to preserve correct polarity.

 



 

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